BOM 6-15-17

Book of the Month Is…

BOM 6-15-17

The Silence of the Lambs is a novel by Thomas Harris. First published in 1988, it is the sequel to Harris’ 1981 novel Red Dragon. Both novels feature the cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter, this time pitted against FBI Special Agent Clarice Starling. Its film adaptation directed by Jonathan Demme was released in 1991 to box office success and critical acclaim.

Plot summary

Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee, is asked to carry out an errand by Jack Crawford, the head of the FBI division that draws up psychological profiles of serial killers. Starling is to present a questionnaire to the brilliant forensic psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer, Hannibal Lecter. Lecter is serving nine consecutive life sentences in a Maryland mental institution for a series of murders.
Crawford’s real intention, however, is to try to solicit Lecter’s assistance in the hunt for a serial killer dubbed “Buffalo Bill”, whose modus operandi involves kidnapping overweight women, starving them for about three or four days, and then killing and skinning them, before dumping the remains in nearby rivers. The nickname was started by Kansas City Homicide, as a sick joke that “he likes to skin his humps.” Throughout the investigation, Starling periodically returns to Lecter in search of information, and the two form a strange relationship in which he offers her cryptic clues in return for information about her troubled and bleak childhood as an orphan.
When Bill’s sixth victim is found in West Virginia, Starling helps Crawford perform the autopsy. Starling finds a pupa in the throat of the victim, and just as Lecter predicted, she has been scalped. Triangular patches of skin have also been taken from her shoulders. Furthermore, autopsy reports indicate that Bill had killed her within four days of her capture, much faster than his earlier victims.

On the basis of Lecter’s prediction, Starling believes that he knows who Buffalo Bill really is. She also asks why she was sent to fish for information on Buffalo Bill without being told she was doing so; Crawford explains that if she had had an agenda, Lecter would have sensed it and never spoken up.

Starling takes the pupa to the Smithsonian, where it is eventually identified as the Black Witch moth, which would not naturally occur where the victim was found.

In Tennessee, Catherine Baker Martin, daughter of Senator Ruth Martin, is kidnapped. Within six hours, her blouse is found on the roadside, slit up the back: Buffalo Bill’s calling card. He traps her in an oubliette and begins to starve her. Crawford is advised that no less than the President of the United States has expressed “intense interest” in the case, and that a successful rescue is preferable. Crawford estimates they have three days before Catherine is killed. Starling is sent to Lecter with the offer of a deal: if he assists in Catherine’s rescue and Buffalo Bill’s capture, he will be transferred out of the asylum, something he has continually longed for. However, Lecter expresses skepticism at the genuineness of the offer.

After Starling leaves, Lecter reminisces on the past, recalling a conversation with Benjamin Raspail, a former patient whom he had eventually murdered. During therapy sessions, Raspail told Lecter about a former lover, Jame Gumb: after Raspail left Gumb and began dating a sailor named Klaus, Gumb became jealous and murdered Klaus, using his skin to make an apron. Raspail also revealed that Gumb had an epiphany upon watching a moth hatch.

Lecter’s ruminations are interrupted when Dr. Frederick Chilton – the asylum’s administrator and Lecter’s nemesis – steps in. A listening device allowed him to record Starling’s offer, and Chilton has found out that Crawford’s deal is a lie. He offers one of his own: If Lecter reveals Buffalo Bill’s identity, he will indeed get a transfer to another asylum, but only if Chilton gets credit for getting the information from him.

Lecter insists that he’ll only give the information to Senator Martin in person, in Tennessee. Chilton agrees. Unknown to Chilton, Lecter has previously hidden in his mouth a paperclip and some parts of a pen, which were mistakenly given to him by untrained orderlies over his many years at the asylum. He fashions the pen pieces and paperclip into an improvised lockpick, which he later uses to pick his handcuff locks.
In Tennessee, Lecter toys with Senator Martin briefly, enjoying the woman’s anguish, but eventually gives her some information about Buffalo Bill: his name is William “Billy” Rubin, and he has suffered from “elephant ivory anthrax”, a knifemaker’s disease. He also provides an accurate physical description. The name, however, is a red herring: bilirubin is a pigment in human bile and a chief coloring agent in human feces, which the forensic lab compares to the color of Chilton’s hair.
Starling tries one last time to get information from Lecter as he is about to be transferred. He offers a final clue – “we covet what we see every day” – and demands to hear her worst memory. Starling reveals that, after her father’s death, she was sent to live with a cousin on a sheep and horse ranch. One night, she discovered the farmer slaughtering the spring lambs, and fled in terror with one of the slaughter horses whom she named Hannah. The farmer caught her and sent her to an orphanage, where she spent the rest of her childhood, along with Hannah. Lecter thanks her, and the two share a brief moment of connection before Chilton forces her to leave. Later on, she deduces from Lecter’s clue that Buffalo Bill knew his first victim.
Shortly after this, Lecter escapes by killing and eviscerating his guards, using one of their faces as a mask to fool paramedics. Starling continues her search for Buffalo Bill, eventually tracking him down and killing him, rescuing Catherine. She is made a full-fledged FBI agent, and receives a congratulatory telegram from Lecter, who hopes that “the lambs have stopped screaming”.
While writing the letter, Lecter notes to himself that, while he will track down Chilton, Clarice assumes, correctly, he will not come after her. He also predicts correctly that saving Catherine Martin may have granted Clarice some relief, but that the silence will never become eternal, heralding her motives for a continued career at the FBI. Clarice eventually finds rest even after Lecter’s letter, sleeping peacefully “in the silence of the lambs”.

Characters

  • Clarice Starling
  • Dr. Hannibal Lecter
  • Jack Crawford
  • John Brigham
  • Jame “Buffalo Bill” Gumb
  • Barney Matthews
  • Ardelia Mapp
  • Dr. Frederick Chilton
  • Catherine Baker Martin
  • Senator Ruth Martin
  • Paul Krendler
  • Noble Pilcher
  • Albert Roden
  • I. J. Miggs

Literary significance

The novel was a great success. Craig Brown of The Mail on Sunday wrote, “No thriller writer is better attuned than Thomas Harris to the rhythms of suspense. No horror writer is more adept at making the stomach churn”. The Independent wrote, “Utterly gripping”, and Amazon.com wrote, “…driving suspense, compelling characters,…a well-executed thriller…” Children’s novelist, Roald Dahl also greatly enjoyed the novel, describing it as “subtle, horrific and splendid, the best book I have read in a long time”. Author David Foster Wallace used the book as part of his curriculum while teaching at Pomona College and later included the book as well as Harris’s Red Dragon on his list of ten favorite novels. John Dunning says of Silence of the Lambs: [it is] “simply the best thriller I’ve read in five years”.

Accolades

  • The novel won the 1988 Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel.
  • The novel also won the 1989 Anthony Award for Best Novel.
  • It was nominated for the 1989 World Fantasy Award.

Film adaptation

Main article: The Silence of the Lambs (film)
Following the 1986 adaptation of Red Dragon (filmed as Manhunter), The Silence of the Lambs was adapted by Jonathan Demme in 1991. The Silence of the Lambs became the third film in Oscar history to win the following five Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay. It stars Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling and Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter.

Musical adaptation

In 2005, comedian-musicians Jon and Al Kaplan parodied the story, especially the film, in Silence! The Musical. It premiered Off-Off-Broadway and has since had productions in London and Los Angeles.[citation needed] In 2012, the Los Angeles production won the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle awards for Score, Lead Performance, and Choreography.

I got all my Info off WIKIPEDIA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Silence_of_the_Lambs_(novel)

BOM

This months book is The Scarlett Letter By: Nathaniel Hawthorne. I read this book in high school in the 11th grade. That was a while ago lol.

Title_page_for_The_Scarlet_Letter

 

The Scarlet Letter: A Romance is an 1850 work of fiction in a historical setting, written by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. The book is considered to be his “masterwork”. Set in 17th-century Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony, during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

Plot

In June 1642, in the Puritan town of Boston, a crowd gathers to witness the punishment of Hester Prynne, a young woman found guilty of adultery. She is required to wear a scarlet “A” (“A” standing for adulteress) on her dress to shame her. She must stand on the scaffold for three hours, to be exposed to public humiliation. As Hester approaches the scaffold, many of the women in the crowd are angered by her beauty and quiet dignity. When demanded and cajoled to name the father of her child, Hester refuses.

As Hester looks out over the crowd, she notices a small, misshapen man and recognizes him as her long-lost husband, who has been presumed lost at sea. When the husband sees Hester’s shame, he asks a man in the crowd about her and is told the story of his wife’s adultery. He angrily exclaims that the child’s father, the partner in the adulterous act, should also be punished and vows to find the man. He chooses a new name – Roger Chillingworth – to aid him in his plan.

The Reverend John Wilson and the minister of Hester’s church, Arthur Dimmesdale, question the woman, but she refuses to name her lover. After she returns to her prison cell, the jailer brings in Roger Chillingworth, a physician, to calm Hester and her child with his roots and herbs. He and Hester have an open conversation regarding their marriage and the fact that they were both in the wrong. Her lover, however, is another matter and he demands to know who it is; Hester refuses to divulge such information. He accepts this, stating that he will find out anyway, and forces her to hide that he is her husband. If she ever reveals him, he warns her, he will destroy the child’s father. Hester agrees to Chillingworth’s terms although she suspects she will regret it.

Following her release from prison, Hester settles in a cottage at the edge of town and earns a meager living with her needlework. She lives a quiet, sombre life with her daughter, Pearl. She is troubled by her daughter’s unusual fascination by Hester’s scarlet “A”. As she grows older, Pearl becomes capricious and unruly. Her conduct starts rumours, and, not surprisingly, the church members suggest Pearl be taken away from Hester.

Hester, hearing rumors that she may lose Pearl, goes to speak to Governor Bellingham. With him are ministers Wilson and Dimmesdale. Hester appeals to Dimmesdale in desperation, and the minister persuades the governor to let Pearl remain in Hester’s care.

Because Dimmesdale’s health has begun to fail, the townspeople are happy to have Chillingworth, a newly arrived physician, take up lodgings with their beloved minister. Being in such close contact with Dimmesdale, Chillingworth begins to suspect that the minister’s illness is the result of some unconfessed guilt. He applies psychological pressure to the minister because he suspects Dimmesdale to be Pearl’s father. One evening, pulling the sleeping Dimmesdale’s vestment aside, Chillingworth sees a symbol that represents his shame on the minister’s pale chest.

Tormented by his guilty conscience, Dimmesdale goes to the square where Hester was punished years earlier. Climbing the scaffold, he admits his guilt to them but cannot find the courage to do so publicly. Hester, shocked by Dimmesdale’s deterioration, decides to obtain a release from her vow of silence to her husband.

Several days later, Hester meets Dimmesdale in the forest and tells him of her husband and his desire for revenge. She convinces Dimmesdale to leave Boston in secret on a ship to Europe where they can start life anew. Renewed by this plan, the minister seems to gain new energy. On Election Day, Dimmesdale gives what is declared to be one of his most inspired sermons. But as the procession leaves the church, Dimmesdale climbs upon the scaffold and confesses his sin, dying in Hester’s arms. Later, most witnesses swear that they saw a stigma in the form of a scarlet “A” upon his chest, although some deny this statement. Chillingworth, losing his will for revenge, dies shortly thereafter and leaves Pearl a substantial inheritance.

After several years, Hester returns to her cottage and resumes wearing the scarlet letter. When she dies, she is buried near the grave of Dimmesdale, and they share a simple slate tombstone engraved with an escutcheon described as: “On a field, sable, the letter A, gules” (“On a field, black, the letter A, red”).

 

Major theme

 

Elmer Kennedy-Andrews remarks that Hawthorne in “The Custom-house” sets the context for his story and “tells us about ‘romance’, which is his preferred generic term to describe The Scarlet Letter, as his subtitle for the book – ‘A Romance’ – would indicate.” In this introduction, Hawthorne describes a space between materialism and “dreaminess” that he calls “a neutral territory, somewhere between the real world and fairy-land, where the Actual and the Imaginary may meet, and each imbues itself with nature of the other”. This combination of “dreaminess” and realism gave the author space to explore major themes.

 

Other themes

The experience of Hester and Dimmesdale recalls the story of Adam and Eve because, in both cases, sin results in expulsion and suffering. But it also results in knowledge – specifically, in knowledge of what it means to be immoral. For Hester, the Scarlet Letter is a physical manifestation of her sin and reminder of her painful solitude. She contemplates casting it off to obtain her freedom from an oppressive society and a checkered past as well as the absence of God. Because the society excludes her, she considers the possibility that many of the traditions held up by the Puritan culture are untrue and are not designed to bring her happiness.

As for Dimmesdale, the “cheating minister”, his sin gives him “sympathies so intimate with the sinful brotherhood of mankind, so that his chest vibrate[s] in unison with theirs.” His eloquent and powerful sermons derive from this sense of empathy. The narrative of the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is quite in keeping with the oldest and most fully authorized principles in Christian thought. His “Fall” is a descent from apparent grace to his own damnation; he appears to begin in purity but he ends in corruption. The subtlety is that the minister’s belief is his own cheating, convincing himself at every stage of his spiritual pilgrimage that he is saved.

The rose bush’s beauty forms a striking contrast to all that surrounds it – as later the beautifully embroidered scarlet “A” will be held out in part as an invitation to find “some sweet moral blossom” in the ensuing, tragic tale and in part as an image that “the deep heart of nature” (perhaps God) may look more kind on the errant Hester and her child than her Puritan neighbors do. Throughout the work, the nature images contrast with the stark darkness of the Puritans and their systems.

Chillingworth’s misshapen body reflects (or symbolizes) the anger in his soul, which builds as the novel progresses, similar to the way Dimmesdale’s illness reveals his inner turmoil. The outward man reflects the condition of the heart; an observation thought to be inspired by the deterioration of Edgar Allan Poe, whom Hawthorne “much admired”.

Another theme is the extreme legalism of the Puritans and how Hester chooses not to conform to their rules and beliefs. Hester was rejected by the villagers even though she spent her life doing what she could to help the sick and the poor. Because of the social shunning, she spent her life mostly in solitude, and wouldn’t go to church.

As a result, she retreats into her own mind and her own thinking. Her thoughts begin to stretch and go beyond what would be considered by the Puritans as safe or even Christian. She still sees her sin, but begins to look on it differently than the villagers ever have. She begins to believe that a person’s earthly sins don’t necessarily condemn them. She even goes so far as to tell Dimmesdale that their sin has been paid for by their daily penance and that their sin won’t keep them from getting to heaven, however, the Puritans believed that such a sin surely condemns.

But Hester had been alienated from the Puritan society, both in her physical life and spiritual life. When Dimmesdale dies, she knows she has to move on because she can no longer conform to the Puritans’ strictness. Her thinking is free from religious bounds and she has established her own different moral standards and beliefs.

 

Publication history

It was long thought that Hawthorne originally planned The Scarlet Letter to be a shorter novelette which was part of a collection to be named Old Time Legends and that his publisher, James Thomas Fields, convinced him to expand the work to a full-length novel. This is not true: Fields persuaded Hawthorne to publish The Scarlet Letter alone (along with the earlier-completed “Custom House” essay) but he had nothing to do with the length of the story. Hawthorne’s wife Sophia later challenged Fields’ claims a little inexactly: “he has made the absurd boast that he was the sole cause of the Scarlet Letter being published!” She noted that her husband’s friend Edwin Percy Whipple, a critic, approached Fields to consider its publication. The manuscript was written at the Peter Edgerley House in Salem, Massachusetts, still standing as a private residence at 14 Mall Street. It was the last Salem home where the Hawthorne family lived.

The Scarlet Letter was first published in the spring of 1850 by Ticknor & Fields, beginning Hawthorne’s most lucrative period. When he delivered the final pages to Fields in February 1850, Hawthorne said that “some portions of the book are powerfully written” but doubted it would be popular. In fact, the book was an instant best-seller, though, over fourteen years, it brought its author only $1,500. Its initial publication brought wide protest from natives of Salem, who did not approve of how Hawthorne had depicted them in his introduction “The Custom-House”. A 2,500-copy second edition included a preface by Hawthorne dated March 30, 1850, that stated he had decided to reprint his Introduction “without the change of a word… The only remarkable features of the sketch are its frank and genuine good-humor … As to enmity, or ill-feeling of any kind, personal or political, he utterly disclaims such motives”.

The Scarlet Letter was also one of the first mass-produced books in America. In the mid-nineteenth century, bookbinders of home-grown literature typically hand-made their books and sold them in small quantities. The first mechanized printing of The Scarlet Letter, 2,500 volumes, sold out within ten days, and was widely read and discussed to an extent not much experienced in the young country up until that time. Copies of the first edition are often sought by collectors as rare books, and may fetch up to around $18,000 USD.

 

Critical response

On its publication, critic Evert Augustus Duyckinck, a friend of Hawthorne’s, said he preferred the author’s Washington Irving-like tales. Another friend, critic Edwin Percy Whipple, objected to the novel’s “morbid intensity” with dense psychological details, writing that the book “is therefore apt to become, like Hawthorne, too painfully anatomical in his exhibition of them”. English writer George Eliot called The Scarlet Letter, along with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow‘s 1855 book The Song of Hiawatha, the “two most indigenous and masterly productions in American literature”. Most literary critics praised the book but religious leaders took issue with the novel’s subject matter.[15] Orestes Brownson complained that Hawthorne did not understand Christianity, confession, and remorse. A review in The Church Review and Ecclesiastical Register concluded the author “perpetrates bad morals.”

On the other hand, 20th-century writer D. H. Lawrence said that there could not be a more perfect work of the American imagination than The Scarlet Letter. Henry James once said of the novel, “It is beautiful, admirable, extraordinary; it has in the highest degree that merit which I have spoken of as the mark of Hawthorne’s best things—an indefinable purity and lightness of conception…One can often return to it; it supports familiarity and has the inexhaustible charm and mystery of great works of art.”

I found all this info at:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scarlet_Letter

Their are several movies based on this book the most know is probably the one Demi Moore played in. It was done in 1995.

220px-Scarletlettermovieposter

BOM

This month we are continuing The Vampire Chronicles book collection. The second book is The Vampire Lestat that is the book for this month. I have now read the first 3 in this collection and I currently only have the first 4 so I will be stopping this collection after the 4th one unless I get another one in it. Ok here is a summary of the book The Vampire Lestat. It came from Wikipedia.

 

the-vampire-lestat

The Vampire Lestat (1985) is a vampire novel by Anne Rice, and the second in her Vampire Chronicles, following Interview with the Vampire. The story is told from the point of view of Lestat as narrator, and several events in the two books appear to contradict each other, allowing the reader to decide which version of events they believe to be accurate.

Plot summary[edit]

Set in the late 18th century to the late 1980s, the story follows the 200-year-long life of the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt, and his rise from humble beginnings as impoverished nobility in the countryside of the Auvergne in France, to the cosmopolitan city of Paris, to become transformed by the Dark Gift into a vampire.

After escaping his family and running off to Paris with his lover and confidante Nicolas de Lenfent, Lestat is kidnapped and bitten by the reclusive elder vampire Magnus, who orphans him on the night he is made but leaves him with a tower fortress and a vast fortune. Lestat abandons Nicki for fear of causing him harm and shuns contact with his loved ones. Instead, he decides to shower them with gifts and riches from his new found wealth, as a means to compensate his departure from their lives.

Later, his mother, Gabrielle, arrives to say goodbye to him, herself dying of consumption (tuberculosis). In order to save her, Lestat transforms her into his first immortal companion. He later turns Nicki into a vampire after Armand kidnaps him and they begin to grow apart because of Nicki’s sullenness; he later commits suicide by “going into the fire,” from severe depression. Armand “shows” Lestat the history of how he was made by Marius. Compelled by the idea of Marius, Lestat leaves markings carved into rock in numerous places while traveling with Gabrielle, hoping that one day, Marius will see them and find Lestat. Whilst in Egypt, abandoned by Gabrielle, Lestat sleeps in the ground after being burned by the sun, and is recovered by Marius who takes him to his secret Mediterranean island. There, Marius shares his past with him, and shows him Those Who Must Be Kept, Akasha and Enkil, who are the progenitors of all vampires. Once Marius has given his warning to Lestat not to go see them again, and leaves on a short outing, Lestat takes Nicolas’s old violin and plays for the King and Queen, awakening them. Akasha feeds from Lestat as Lestat feeds from her. Then, Enkil, furious at the intrusion, attacks and nearly kills Lestat, who is saved by Marius, and then sent away.

The book ends on a cliffhanger after Lestat’s debut concert in San Francisco, and leads directly into the third volume, The Queen of the Damned.

Adaptations[edit]

Anne Rice’s The Vampire Lestat[edit]

The Vampire Lestat was adapted into a comic and released as a 12-part miniseries by Innovation Comics in 1990 and 1991. The comic, which was formally titled Anne Rice’s The Vampire Lestat and featured Daerick Gross and Mike Okamoto as lead artists, had a script adapted from the novel by Rice and Faye Perozich. In 1991 the entire series was published as a graphic novel by Ballantine.[1]

Queen of the Damned[edit]

Portions of The Vampire Lestat were used and loosely interpreted, in the 2002 film adaptation of The Queen of the Damned.

The Film “Queen of the Damned” was seen to be a critical failure, and disappointed some viewers. Rice herself has dismissed the film. On her Facebook page, any time the subject is brought up, she repeatedly comments that The Queen of the Damned film is not something she can understand or embrace, that she encouraged them not to do the film and that it hurt her to see her work “mutilated” the way it was.[2]

Lestat: The Musical[edit]

The novel formed the basis for the short-lived 2006 Broadway show Lestat. The musical, which was composed by Elton John and Bernie Taupin and written by Linda Woolverton, had a pre-Broadway tryout in California in late 2005 and ran for a total of 33 previews and 39 official performances at the Palace Theater in New York.[3]

Film adaptation[edit]

A film adaptation of The Vampire Lestat was originally planned to go right into development after the filming of Interview with the Vampire, with a theatrical release that was said to have been marked for the late 1990s. Neil Jordan, director of Interview with the Vampire, took on the opportunity of adapting the novel. However, not only did development lead nowhere, there was much stress brought on by the project as time was limited before the novel’s rights would revert to Rice. This included Lorimar Pictures folding when Warner Bros. bought them out. David Geffen, after founding his own studio, attempted to take the rights with him to produce the sequels; however, the rights remained the property of Warner Bros. Rice confirmed that the project had difficulties at the time, describing the process as “stressful” for Warner Bros., and admitting there was “no good news” regarding the possible theatrical film. She also said via her website that her material was not comprehensible among producers; this statement would only prove true nearly a decade later when the loosely based film adaptation for The Queen of the Damned was released.

As of August 2009, talks have been underway in the continuation of The Vampire Chronicles film series, with The Vampire Lestat being the next film to be focused on in the series. Robert Downey Jr. was reported to be in talks to take the role of Lestat, but he has dismissed the rumors. Film producers reportedly want to revive the film series in the wake of a string of successful vampire films including Twilight and the HBO series True Blood—and Downey Jr. was reportedly in contention to take the lead.

On May 13, 2011 Rice posted on her Facebook page saying that she had “good news, good for me, and good for my beloved Lestat. I hope soon I can say something more coherent and informative, but for now, I’m celebrating.” Many of her fans believe this is an insinuation of a new adaptation of the novel.

Ron Howard’s production company, Imagine Entertainment, had optioned the motion picture rights to Anne’s fourth novel in her Vampire Chronicles series, The Tale of the Body Thief in early 2012. Their proposal for the film was to treat Lestat as if “audiences have not met him before.” In April 2013, Rice herself announced during an interview on her son’s radio show that the project had been dismissed due to an indifference between those involved. However, Rice did specifically state that the issue could be worked out someday.

In August 2014, Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment acquired the motion picture rights to the entire Vampire Chronicles series, with producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci signed to helm the potential film franchise. The deal also included a screenplay for The Tale of the Body Thief (1992) adapted by Christopher Rice.[4] In May 2016, writer-director Josh Boone posted a photo on Instagram of the cover a script written by him and Jill Killington.[5][6][7] Titled Interview with the Vampire, it is based on the novel of the same name and its sequel, The Vampire Lestat.[5][6][7] However, in November 2016 Universal did not renew the contract, and the film and television rights reverted to Rice, who began developing the Vampire Chronicles into a television series with Christopher.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Vampire_Lestat

 

BOM

Our book of the month is Interview with the Vampire from The Vampire Chronicles Collection By Anne Rice. I have the 3 in one copy of the book so I will do the first 3 for our first books I also have the 4th book in the collection as well. I know this book is more adult oriented and we will have some kids books coming to but this is what I picked first because I love it so much. I am going to give you a brief summery of the book. If you want to you can also watch the movie.

BOM

Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire is a debut gothic horror and vampire novel by American author Anne Rice, published in 1976. Based on a short story Rice wrote around 1968, the novel centers on vampire Louis de Pointe du Lac, who tells the story of his life to a reporter. Rice composed the novel shortly after the death of her young daughter Michelle, who served as an inspiration for the child-vampire character Claudia. Though initially the subject of mixed critical reception, the book was followed by a large number of widely popular sequels, collectively known as The Vampire Chronicles. A film adaptation was released in 1994, starring Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise, and the novel has been adapted as a comic three times.

Interview with the Vampire book synopsis

A vampire named Louis tells his 200-year-long life story to a reporter referred to simply as “the boy”. In 1791, Louis is a young indigo plantation owner living south of New Orleans. Distraught by the death of his pious brother, he seeks death in any way possible. Louis is approached by a vampire named Lestat de Lioncourt, who desires Louis’ company. Lestat turns Louis into a vampire and the two become immortal companions. Lestat spends time feeding off the local plantation slaves while Louis, who finds it morally repugnant to murder humans to survive, feeds from animals. Louis and Lestat are forced to leave when Louis’ slaves begin to fear the monsters with which they live and instigate an uprising. Louis sets his own plantation aflame; he and Lestat exterminate the plantation slaves to keep word from spreading about vampires living in Louisiana. Gradually, Louis bends under Lestat’s influence and begins feeding from humans. He slowly comes to terms with his vampire nature, but also becomes increasingly repulsed by what he perceives as Lestat’s total lack of compassion for the humans he preys upon. Escaping to New Orleans, Louis feeds off a plague-ridden young girl, who is five years old, whom he finds next to the corpse of her mother. Louis begins to think of leaving Lestat and going his own way. Fearing this, Lestat then turns the girl into a vampire “daughter” for them, to give Louis a reason to stay. She is then given the name Claudia. Louis is initially horrified that Lestat has turned a child into a vampire, but soon begins to care for Claudia. Claudia takes to killing easily, but she begins to realize over time she can never grow up; her mind matures into that of an intelligent, assertive woman, but her body remains that of a young girl. Claudia blames Lestat for her condition and, after 60 years of living with him, she hatches a plot to kill Lestat by poisoning him and cutting his throat. Claudia and Louis then dump his body into a nearby swamp. As Louis and Claudia prepare to flee to Europe, Lestat appears, having recovered from Claudia’s attack, and attacks them in turn. Louis sets fire to their home and barely escapes with Claudia, leaving a furious Lestat to be consumed by the flames. Arriving in Europe, Louis and Claudia seek out more of their kind. They travel throughout eastern Europe first and do indeed encounter vampires, but these vampires appear to be nothing more than mindless animated corpses. It is only when they reach Paris that they encounter vampires like themselves – specifically, the 400-year-old vampire Armand and his coven at the Théâtre des Vampires. Inhabiting an ancient theater, Armand and his vampire coven disguise themselves as humans and feed on live, terrified humans in mock-plays before a live human audience. Claudia is repulsed by these vampires and what she considers to be their cheap theatrics, but Louis and Armand are drawn to each other. Convinced that Louis will leave her for Armand, Claudia convinces Louis to turn a Parisian doll maker, Madeleine, into a vampire to serve as a replacement companion. Louis, Madeleine and Claudia live together for a brief time, but all three are abducted one night by the Theatre vampires. Lestat has arrived, having survived the fire in New Orleans. His accusations against Louis and Claudia result in Louis being locked in a coffin to starve, while Claudia and Madeleine are locked in an open courtyard. Armand arrives and releases Louis from the coffin, but Madeleine and Claudia are burned to death by the rising sun. A devastated Louis finds the ashen remains of Claudia and Madeleine. He returns to the Theatre late the following night, burning it to the ground and killing all the vampires inside, leaving with Armand. Together, the two travel across Europe for several years, but Louis never fully recovers from Claudia’s death, and the emotional connection between himself and Armand quickly dissolves. Tired of the Old World, Louis returns to New Orleans in the early 20th century. Living as a loner, he feeds off any humans who cross his path, but lives in the shadows, never creating another companion for himself. Telling the boy of one last encounter with Lestat in New Orleans in the 1920s, Louis ends his tale; after 200 years, he is weary of immortality and of all the pain and suffering to which he has had to bear witness. The boy, however, seeing only the great powers granted to a vampire, begs to be made into a vampire himself. Angry that his interviewer learned nothing from his story, Louis refuses, attacking the boy and vanishing without a trace. The boy then leaves to track down Lestat in the hopes that he can give him immortality.

Background and publication

In 1970, while Anne Rice was attending a graduate program in Creative Writing at San Francisco State University, her daughter Michelle, then about four years old, was diagnosed with acute granulocytic leukemia. Michelle died of the illness about two years later, and Rice fell into a deep depression, turning to alcohol in order to cope. Later reviewers and commentators identified Michelle as an inspiration for the character of Claudia.

In 1973, while still grieving the loss of her daughter, Rice began reworking a previously written short story, which she had written in 1968 or 1969. Thirty pages long, the short story was written from the interviewer’s perspective. She decided to expand “Interview with the Vampire” into a novel at the encouragement of one of her husband’s students, who enjoyed her writing. It took her five weeks to complete the 338-page novel: she did research on vampires during the day and often wrote during the night.

After completing the novel and following many rejections from publishers, Rice developed obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). She became obsessed with germs, thinking that she contaminated everything she touched, engaged in frequent and obsessive hand washing and obsessively checked locks on windows and doors. Of this period, Rice says, “What you see when you’re in that state is every single flaw in our hygiene and you can’t control it and you go crazy.”

In August 1974, Rice attended the Squaw Valley Writer’s Conference at Squaw Valley, conducted by writer Ray Nelson. While at the conference, she met her future literary agent, Phyllis Seidel. In October 1974, Seidel sold the publishing rights to Interview with the Vampire to Alfred A. Knopf for a $12,000 advance of the hardcover rights, at a time when most new authors were receiving $2,000 advances. Interview with the Vampire was published in May 1976. In 1977, the Rice’s traveled to both Europe and Egypt for the first time.

Upon its release, Interview with the Vampire received mixed reviews from critics. A reviewer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch gave the book a positive review, describing the prose as “hypnotically poetic in tone, rich in sensory imagery,” while other reviews were more negative. “To pretend that it has any purpose beyond suckling eroticism is rank hypocrisy,” wrote Edith Milton of The New Republic. As of February 2008[update], the novel had sold 8 million copies worldwide.

The book spawned a total of eleven sequels, collectively known as The Vampire Chronicles, and the spin-off series New Tales of the Vampires. The first sequel, The Vampire Lestat, was published in 1985 and sold more than 75,000 copies in its first printing, garnering largely favorable reviews. 1988’s The Queen of the Damned improved on Lestat’s numbers, receiving an initial hardcover run of 405,000 and topping the New York Times Best Seller list. Rice’s vampire books share a fictional universe with her series Lives of the Mayfair Witches and the novel The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned

Adaptations

Film

The film rights to Interview were at times controlled by Paramount Pictures, Lorimar, and Warner Bros., the distributor of the film, before The Geffen Film Company acquired the rights. Director Neil Jordan rewrote Rice’s first draft of the screenplay, though she received sole credit. Brad Pitt starred as Louis, Tom Cruise starred as Lestat, Antonio Banderas co-starred as Armand, as did a young Kirsten Dunst as the child vampire Claudia. Most of the movie’s shooting had been completed by October 1993, and all that remained were the few scenes involving the interviewer that would then be inserted at various points throughout the film. Production of those scenes was put on hold for a few weeks whilst River Phoenix, who had been cast as the interviewer, finished working on the film Dark Blood. Phoenix died from an overdose later that month, and Christian Slater was then cast as the interviewer Molloy. Slater donated his entire salary to Earth Save and Earth Trust, two of Phoenix’s favorite charities.

The film was released in November 1994 to generally positive critical reaction, and received Academy Award nominations for Best Art Direction and Best Original Score. Dunst was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film. Rice had initially voiced her objections to the casting of Cruise as Lestat, preferring Rutger Hauer for the role. After seeing the film, however, she voiced her support for the film, saying, “That Tom did make Lestat work was something I could not see in a crystal ball. It’s to his credit that he proved me wrong.”

In August 2014, Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment acquired the motion picture rights to the entire Vampire Chronicles series, with producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci signed to helm the potential film franchise. The deal also included a screenplay for The Tale of the Body Thief (1992) adapted by Christopher Rice. In May 2016, writer-director Josh Boone posted a photo on Instagram of the cover a script written by him and Jill Killington. Titled Interview with the Vampire, it is based on the novel of the same name and its sequel, The Vampire Lestat. However, in November 2016 Universal did not renew the contract, and the film and television rights reverted to Rice, who began developing the Vampire Chronicles into a television series with Christopher.

Comics

Innovation Comics published a twelve-issue comic book adaptation of Interview with the Vampire in 1992, following up on adaptations of The Vampire Lestat and The Queen of the Damned. A Japanese manga adaptation by Udou Shinohara was published in 1994 by Tokuma Shoten. It was also serialized in both Animage and Chara magazines. In 2012, the graphic novel Interview with the Vampire: Claudia’s Story was published by Yen Press, retelling much of the original novel from the point of view of child vampire Claudia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interview_with_the_Vampire