BOM 8-15-17

Book of the Month
(BOM)

The book of the month is a book we have read for the month and want to share with you. We do look up info on the book and post a large summery about it but we only post the books we have read and we recognize the website we get the info from at the bottom of the post.
Let me know if you have read it in the comments.

We got a fun pick this week and Trevor aka Daddy helped pick it out. The book is The Chronicles Of Narnia “The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe” by: C. S. Lewis

August

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis, published by Geoffrey Bles in 1950. It is the first published and best known of seven novels in The Chronicles of Narnia (1950–1956). Among all the author’s books it is also the most widely held in libraries. Although it was written as well as published first in the series, it is volume two in recent editions, which are sequenced by the stories’ chronology (the first being The Magician’s Nephew). Like the others, it was illustrated by Pauline Baynes, and her work has been retained in many later editions.
Most of the novel is set in Narnia, a land of talking animals and mythical creatures that one White Witch has ruled for 100 years of deep winter. In the frame story, four English children are relocated to a large, old country house following a wartime evacuation. The youngest visits Narnia three times via the magic of a wardrobe in a spare room. All four children are together on her third visit, which verifies her fantastic claims and comprises the subsequent 12 of 17 chapters except for a brief conclusion. In Narnia, the siblings seem fit to fulfill an old prophecy and so are soon adventuring both to save Narnia and their lives. Lewis wrote the book for, and dedicated it to, his goddaughter Lucy Barfield. She was the daughter of Owen Barfield, Lewis’s friend, teacher, adviser, and trustee.

 

Plot summary

In 1940, four siblings – Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy Pevensie – are among many children evacuated from London during World War II to escape the Blitz. They are sent to the countryside to live with professor Digory Kirke. Exploring the professor’s house, Lucy finds a wardrobe which doubles as a magic portal to a forest in a land called Narnia. At a lamppost oddly located in the forest, she meets Tumnus, a faun, who invites her to tea in his home. There the faun confesses that he invited her not out of hospitality, but with the intention of betraying her to the White Witch. The witch has ruled Narnia for years, using magic to keep it frozen in a perpetual winter. She has ordered all Narnians to turn in any humans (“Sons of Adam” or “Daughters of Eve”) they come across. But now that he has come to know and like a human, Tumnus repents his original intention and escorts Lucy back to the lamppost.
Lucy returns through the wardrobe and finds that only a few seconds have passed in normal time during her absence. Her siblings do not believe her story about another world inside the wardrobe, which is now found to have a solid back panel.
During a game of hide-and-seek on some days later, Lucy again passes into Narnia. This time her brother Edmund chances to follow her. He meets Jadis, who calls herself Queen of Narnia. When she learns that he is human and has two sisters and a brother, she places an enchantment on him. She urges him to bring his siblings to her castle, promising in return to make him her heir. When Lucy and Edmund return together through the wardrobe, Edmund realizes that the queen he met and the witch Lucy describes are one and the same. He denies to the others that he has been in Narnia at all. Peter and Susan are puzzled by Lucy’s insistence, and consult the Professor, who surprises them by taking Lucy’s side in the debate of Narnia’s existence.
Soon afterward, all four children enter Narnia together after hiding in the wardrobe to avoid the professor’s dour housekeeper, Mrs. Macready. Remembering the winter cold ahead, they take coats from the wardrobe before exploring. Lucy guides them to Tumnus’s cave, but they find it ransacked, with a notice from Jadis (the White Witch) proclaiming his arrest for harbouring humans.
A talking beaver intercepts them, proves himself a friend, and hides the children in his den. There, he and Mrs. Beaver tell them of a prophecy that Jadis’s power will fail when two Sons of Adam and two Daughters of Eve fill the four thrones at Cair Paravel. Aslan, the great lion and the rightful King, has been absent for many years but is now “on the move again” in Narnia.
Edmund steals away to Jadis’s castle, which is filled with statues of Narnian victims she has turned to stone. Jadis is furious when Edmund appears alone and angrier still to learn that Aslan may have returned. She takes him on her sledge to catch the others or to reach Aslan’s court before them.
Meanwhile, Mr Beaver realises that Edmund has betrayed them, and they set off at once to seek Aslan at the Stone Table. As they travel, the Witch’s spell over Narnia begins to break: Father Christmas (who has not been seen in Narnia for a hundred years) arrives with magical presents: a sword for Peter, a horn and a bow with arrows for Susan, a knife and a bottle of healing cordial for Lucy. The snow melts, and winter ends. Aslan welcomes the children and the Beavers to his camp near the Stone Table. Upon hearing Edmund’s situation, he orders a rescue party of loyal Narnians.
After much hardship at the hands of the Witch and her sledge driver, Edmund is rescued from their camp and reunited with his siblings. Jadis approaches in truce to parley with Aslan. She insists that, according to “deep magic from the dawn of time”, she holds the right to kill Edmund following his treason. Aslan bargains with her privately and she renounces her claim.
That evening, Aslan secretly returns to the Stone Table, shadowed by Susan and Lucy. Upon noticing them, Aslan welcomes their company but warns them not to interfere with what is about to happen. He has traded his own life to the witch for Edmund’s, and the girls watch as Jadis oversees his shaming before her underlings. She orders Aslan tied to the Stone Table, shaved and muzzled; and she administers the killing blow herself.
Confident now of victory, the Witch leads her army away to battle. Susan and Lucy remain weeping over Aslan’s abandoned body. They un-muzzle him and see mice gnaw away his bonds. The Stone Table breaks and Aslan is restored to life. He tells Lucy and Susan that Jadis was unaware of the “deeper magic from before the dawn of time” that will resurrect an innocent killed in place of a traitor.
Aslan carries Lucy and Susan on his back as he hurries to Jadis’s castle. He breathes upon the stone statues in the courtyard, restoring them to life.
Meanwhile, Peter and Edmund lead the Narnians against Jadis, and Edmund is seriously wounded. Aslan arrives with the former statues as reinforcements. The Narnians rout Jadis’s supporters, and Aslan kills Jadis. Aslan breathes life into those Jadis has turned to stone on the battlefield, and Lucy uses her magic cordial to revive the wounded, starting with Edmund. The Pevensie children are crowned kings and queens of Narnia at Cair Paravel. Soon afterward, Aslan slips away and disappears.
Fifteen years later, the four rulers chase a wish-granting white stag through the forest whereupon they rediscover the lamppost. They soon find their way not through branches but coats. They come back through the wardrobe in the Professor’s house and are suddenly children again, dressed in their old clothes. Almost no time has passed in the real world, despite their many years in Narnia.
The four children consult the Professor. He forgives them the absence of the four coats they stole, and hints that theirs would prove not to be the first adventure in Narnia, nor by any means the last.

Character list

The Pevensie Siblings

Raised in London, evacuated to the Dorset countryside, and reaching adulthood in Narnia, they are the four main characters. In one chapter, Father Christmas arrives to endow those present (three Pevensies and two beavers) with a feast, weapons, and magical items. After the restoration of Narnia, a Tetrarchy is established with the four siblings as the rulers.
Lucy Pevensie is the youngest Pevensie child and, in some respects, the primary protagonist of the story. She is the first to discover the land of Narnia when she finds her way through the magical wardrobe in the Professor’s house. When Lucy tells her three siblings, they don’t believe her: Peter and Susan think she is just playing a game while Edmund persistently ridicules her about it. She is later crowned Queen Lucy the Valiant.
Edmund Pevensie is the second-youngest of the Pevensie children. He has a bad relationship with his siblings. Edmund is known to be a liar, and often harasses children younger than him. He often singles out Lucy as his favourite target. In Narnia he meets the White Witch, who plies him with enchanted Turkish delight, drink, and smooth talk. Lured by the White Witch’s promise of power and an unlimited supply of the magical treats, Edmund betrays his siblings. He eventually regrets his actions and repents. After he helps Aslan and the good denizens of Narnia defeat the White Witch, he is crowned and named King Edmund the Just. He has no endowments, because of his betrayal.
Susan Pevensie is the second-oldest of Pevensie children. She does not believe in Narnia until she actually goes there. Along with Lucy, she accompanies Aslan on the journey to his apparent self-sacrifice and secretly witnesses the horrific event. Tending to his carcass, she removes a muzzle from him to restore his dignity and oversees a horde of mice who gnaw away his bonds. She then shares the joy of his resurrection and the endeavor to bring reinforcements to a critical battle. She is crowned Queen of Narnia alongside Lucy and pronounced Queen Susan the Gentle.
Peter Pevensie is the eldest of the Pevensie siblings. He judiciously settles disputes between his younger brother and sisters, often rebuking Edmund for his attitude. At first, Peter disbelieves Lucy’s stories about Narnia, but changes his mind when he sees it for himself. He is hailed as a hero for the slaying of Maugrim and for his command in the battle to overthrow the White Witch. He is eventually crowned High King of Narnia and dubbed King Peter the Magnificent.

At the Country Home

The house that shelters the Pevensie children is run by a Professor, staffed by servants, and frequently toured by historians.
The Professor is a kindly old gentleman who takes the Pevensie children in when they are evacuated from London. He is the first to believe that Lucy did indeed visit a land called Narnia. He tries to convince the others logically that she didn’t make it up. The book hints that he knows more of Narnia than he lets on. He is identified in The Voyage of the Dawn Treader as Professor Kirke, and appears as a young boy, Digory Kirke, a main character in the prequel, in which he witnesses Aslan’s creation of Narnia. Although never explicitly stated, there are minor parallels between himself and Aslan on the smaller scale of the house in Dorset; in that he is rarely seen, can be sought for impartial wisdom, provides a sense of stability, and sometimes cannot be found.
Mrs. Macready is the housekeeper for the Professor and takes it upon herself to guide the tour groups. Although never explicitly stated, there are minor parallels between herself and the White Witch, albeit on the smaller scale; for example, she effectively rules the country house in the absence of the Professor (terrifyingly so in the imagination of a young girl torn from her home and mother). The Pevensies certainly see her as an antagonist and dub her “The Macready”. She is stated to be not very fond of children, imposes strict rules on their behavior, and disturbs their peace with the tours.

Narnians

The magical land of Narnia is populated by talking animals, mythological species, and sentient flora.
Aslan, a lion, is the rightful King of Narnia and other magic countries. He sacrifices himself to save Edmund, but is resurrected in time to aid the denizens of Narnia and the Pevensie children against the White Witch and her minions. As the “son of the Emperor beyond the sea”( an allusion to the first person of the Holy Trinity in Christianity (the Father) Aslan is the all powerful creator of Narnia. He is the deity that links all created worlds together and is thus all knowing, all present, and all powerful.
The White Witch is the land’s self-proclaimed queen and the primary antagonist of the story. She tyrannizes Narnia through her magically imposed rule. Her spell on Narnia has made winter persist for a hundred years with no end in sight. When provoked, she turns creatures to stone with her wand. She fears the fulfillment of a prophecy that “two sons of Adam and two daughters of Eve” (meaning humans; two male, two female) will claim the right to rule and supplant her. She is usually referred to simply as “the White Witch” but her actual name, “Jadis,” appears in one proclamation in this book. Lewis later wrote a prequel to include her back-story and account for her presence in the Narnian world.
Tumnus, a faun, is the first individual Lucy meets in Narnia. Tumnus befriends Lucy, despite the White Witch’s standing order to turn in any human found in Narnia. He initially plans to obey the order but, after getting to like Lucy, he cannot bear to alert the Witch’s forces. He instead escorts her back towards the safety of her own country. His good deed is later given away by Edmund who innocently tells the White Witch that Lucy mentioned meeting a faun. The witch orders Tumnus arrested and turns him to stone, but he is later restored to life by Aslan.
Mr. and Mrs. Beaver, two beavers, are friends of Tumnus. They play host to Peter, Susan, and Lucy and lead them to Aslan.
A Dwarf serves the White Witch. He’s never named in the book but called Ginabrik in the film, where he has a more significant role.
Maugrim (Fenris Ulf in most American editions) the wolf is the chief of the White Witch’s secret police. She sends him to hunt down the Pevensie children. He tries to kill Susan who flees and sees to the safety of others. She sounds her horn. Peter answers the call and slays Maugrim.
Giant Rumblebuffin is a character who is turned to stone by the White Witch. Aslan restores him to life by breathing on him. Although slightly dim-witted, he is very kind. His significant contribution is to break down the gate of the Witch’s castle to let the rescued Narnians out, and also to crush some of her army.
Writing
Lewis described the origin of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in an essay titled “It All Began with a Picture”:
The Lion all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood. This picture had been in my mind since I was about sixteen. Then one day, when I was about forty, I said to myself: ‘Let’s try to make a story about it.’
Shortly before the Second World War many children were evacuated from London to the English countryside to escape bomber attacks on London by Nazi Germany. On 2 September 1939 three school girls, Margaret, Mary and Katherine, came to live at The Kilns in Risinghurst, Lewis’s home three miles east of Oxford city centre. Lewis later suggested that the experience gave him a new appreciation of children and in late September he began a children’s story on an odd sheet that has survived as part of another manuscript:
This book is about four children whose names were Ann, Martin, Rose and Peter. But it is most about Peter who was the youngest. They all had to go away from London suddenly because of Air Raids, and because Father, who was in the Army, had gone off to the War and Mother was doing some kind of war work. They were sent to stay with a kind of relation of Mother’s who was a very old professor who lived all by himself in the country.
The plot element of entering a new world through the back of a wardrobe had certainly entered Lewis’s mind by 1946, when he used it to describe his first encounter with really good poetry:
I did not in the least feel that I was getting in more quantity or better quality a pleasure I had already known. It was more as if a cupboard which one had hitherto valued as a place for hanging coats proved one day, when you opened the door, to lead to the garden of the Hesperides …
How much more of the story Lewis then wrote is uncertain. Roger Lancelyn Green thinks that he might even have completed it. In September 1947 Lewis wrote in a letter about stories for children: “I have tried one myself but it was, by the unanimous verdict of my friends, so bad that I destroyed it.”
In August 1948, during a visit by an American writer, Chad Walsh, Lewis talked vaguely about completing a children’s book he had begun “in the tradition of E. Nesbit”. After this conversation not much happened until the beginning of the next year. Then everything changed. In his essay “It All Began With a Picture” Lewis continues: “At first I had very little idea how the story would go. But then suddenly Aslan came bounding into it. I think I had been having a good many dreams of lions about that time. Apart from that, I don’t know where the Lion came from or why he came. But once he was there, he pulled the whole story together, and soon he pulled the six other Narnian stories in after him.”
The major ideas of the book echo lines Lewis had written fourteen years earlier in his alliterative poem The Planets:
… Of wrath ended
And woes mended, of winter passed
And guilt forgiven, and good fortune
Jove is master; and of jocund revel,
Laughter of ladies. The lion-hearted
… are Jove’s children.
On 10 March 1949 Roger Lancelyn Green dined with Lewis at Magdalen College. After the meal Lewis read two chapters from his new children’s story to Green. Lewis asked Green’s opinion of the tale and Green said that he thought it was good. The manuscript of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was complete by the end of March 1949. Lucy Barfield received it by the end of May. When on 16 October 1950 Geoffrey Bles in London published the first edition, three new “chronicles”, Prince Caspian, The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and The Horse and His Boy, had also been completed.
Illustrations
Lewis’s publisher, Geoffrey Bles, allowed him to choose the illustrator for the novel and the Narnia series. Lewis chose Pauline Baynes, possibly based on J. R. R. Tolkien’s recommendation. Baynes had greatly impressed Tolkien with her illustrations for his Farmer Giles of Ham (1949). However, Baynes claimed that Lewis learned about her work after going into a bookshop and asking for a recommendation for an illustrator who was skilled at portraying both humans and animals. In December 1949, Bles showed Lewis the first drawings for the novel, and Lewis sent Baynes a note congratulating her, particularly on the level of detail. Lewis’s appreciation of the illustrations is evident in a letter he wrote to Baynes after The Last Battle won the Carnegie Medal for best children’s book of 1956: “is it not rather ‘our’ medal? I’m sure the illustrations were taken into account as well as the text”.
The British edition of the novel had 43 illustrations; American editions generally had fewer. The popular United States paperback edition published by Collier between 1970 and 1994, which sold many millions, had only 17 illustrations, many of them severely cropped from the originals, giving many readers in that country a very different experience when reading the novel. All the illustrations were restored for the 1994 worldwide HarperCollins edition, although these lacked the clarity of early printings.
Reception
Lewis very much enjoyed writing The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe and embarked on the sequel Prince Caspian soon after finishing the first novel. He completed the sequel by end of 1949, less than a year after finishing the initial book. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe had few readers during 1949 and was not published until late in 1950, so his initial enthusiasm did not stem from favourable reception by the public.
While Lewis is known today on the strength of the Narnia stories as a highly successful children’s writer, the initial critical response was muted. At the time it was fashionable for children’s stories to be realistic; fantasy and fairy tales were seen as indulgent, appropriate only for very young readers and potentially harmful to older children, even hindering their ability to relate to everyday life. Some reviewers considered the tale overtly moralistic or the Christian elements over-stated — attempts to indoctrinate children. Others were concerned that the many violent incidents might frighten children.
Lewis’s publisher, Geoffrey Bles, feared that the Narnia tales would not sell, and might damage Lewis’ reputation and affect sales of his other books. Nevertheless, the novel and its successors were highly popular with young readers, and Lewis’s publisher was soon eager to release further Narnia stories.
In the United States a 2004 study found that The Lion was a common read-aloud book for seventh-graders in schools in San Diego County, California. In 2005 it was included on TIME’s unranked list of the 100 best English-language novels published since 1923. Based on a 2007 online poll, the U.S. National Education Association named it one of “Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children”. In 2012 it was ranked number five among all-time children’s novels in a survey published by School Library Journal, a monthly with primarily U.S. audience.
A 2012 survey by the University of Worcester determined that it was the second most common book that UK adults had read as children, after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. (Adults, perhaps limited to parents, ranked Alice and The Lion fifth and sixth as books the next generation should read, or their children should read during their lifetimes.)
TIME magazine included the novel in its “All-TIME 100 Novels” (best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005). In 2003, the novel was listed at number 9 on the BBC’s survey The Big Read. It has also been published in 47 foreign languages.
Allusions
Lewis wrote that “The Narnian books are not as much allegory as supposal. Suppose there were a Narnian world and it, like ours, needed redemption. What kind of incarnation and Passion might Christ be supposed to undergo there?”
The main story is an allegory of Christ’s crucifixion: Aslan sacrifices himself for Edmund, a traitor who may deserve death, in the same way that Christians believe Jesus sacrificed himself for sinners. Aslan is killed on the Stone Table, symbolizing Mosaic Law, which breaks when he is resurrected, symbolizing the replacement of the strict justice of Old Testament law with redeeming grace and forgiveness granted on the basis of substitutional atonement, according to Christian theology. As with the Christian Passion, it is women (Susan and Lucy) who tend Aslan’s body after he dies and are the first to see him after his resurrection. The significance of the death contains elements of both the ransom theory of atonement and the satisfaction theory: Aslan suffers Edmund’s penalty (satisfaction), and buys him back from the White Witch, who was entitled to him by reason of his treachery (ransom). In Christian belief, Christ is associated with the Biblical “Lion of Judah” of Revelation 5:5.
Professor Kirke is based on W.T. Kirkpatrick, who tutored a 16-year-old Lewis. “Kirk,” as he was sometimes called, taught the young Lewis much about thinking and communicating clearly, skills that would be invaluable to him later.
Narnia is caught in endless winter that has lasted a century when the children first enter. Norse tradition mythologises a “great winter,” known as the Fimbulwinter, said to precede Ragnarök. The trapping of Edmund by the White Witch is reminiscent of the seduction and imprisonment of Kay by The Snow Queen in Hans Christian Andersen’s novella of that name.
The dwarves and giants are found in Norse mythology; fauns, centaurs, minotaurs and dryads derive from Greek mythology. Father Christmas, of course, was part of popular English folklore.
There are several parallels between the White Witch and the immortal white queen, Ayesha, of H. Rider Haggard’s She, a novel greatly admired by C.S. Lewis.
The Story of the Amulet written by Edith Nesbit also contains scenes that can be considered precursors to sequences presenting Jadis, particularly in The Magician’s Nephew. Nesbit’s short story The Aunt and Amabel includes the motif of a girl entering a wardrobe to gain access to a magical place.
The freeing of Aslan’s body from the stone table by field mice is reminiscent of Aesop’s fable of “The Lion and the Mouse.” In the fable, a lion catches a mouse, but the mouse persuades the lion to release him, promising that the favor would be rewarded. Later in the story, he gnaws through the lion’s bonds after he has been captured by hunters. It is also reminiscent of a scene from Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Pit and the Pendulum,” in which a prisoner is freed when rats gnaw through his bonds. In a later book, “Prince Caspian,” we learn that as reward for their actions, mice gained the same intelligence and speech as other Narnian animals.
Differences between editions
Due to labor union rules, the text of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was reset for the publication of the first American edition of by Macmillan US in 1950. Lewis took that opportunity to make the following changes to the original British edition published by Geoffrey Bles earlier that same year:
In chapter one of the American edition, the animals that Edmund and Susan express interest in are snakes and foxes rather than the foxes and rabbits of the British edition.
In chapter six of the American edition, the name of the White Witch’s chief of police is changed to “Fenris Ulf” from “Maugrim” in the British.
In chapter thirteen of the American edition, “the trunk of the World Ash Tree” takes the place of “the fire-stones of the Secret Hill”.
When HarperCollins took over publication of the series in 1994, they began using the original British edition for all subsequent English editions worldwide. The current US edition published by Scholastic has 36,135 words.

Adaptations

Television

The story has been adapted three times for television. The first adaptation was a ten-part serial produced by ABC Weekend Television for ITV and broadcast in 1967. In 1979, an animated TV-movie,[48] directed by Peanuts director Bill Meléndez, was broadcast and won the first Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program. A third television adaptation was produced in 1988 by the BBC using a combination of live actors, animatronic puppets and animation. Only this last one was the first of a series of 3 Narnia adaptations. The programme was nominated for an Emmy and won a BAFTA. It was followed by three further Narnia adaptations.

Theatre

Stage adaptations include a 1984 version staged at London’s Westminster Theatre, produced by Vanessa Ford Productions. The play, adapted by Glyn Robbins, was directed by Richard Williams and designed by Marty Flood. Jules Tasca, Ted Drachman, and Thomas Tierney collaborated on a musical adaptation published in 1986.
In 1997, Trumpets Inc., a Filipino Christian theatre and musical production company, produced a musical rendition that Douglas Gresham, Lewis’s stepson (and co-producer of the Walden Media film adaptations), has openly declared that he feels is the closest to Lewis’s intention. It starred among others popular young Filipino singer Sam Concepcion as Edmund Pevensie. The book and lyrics were written by Jaime del Mundo and Luna Inocian, while music was composed by Lito Villareal.
In 1998, the Royal Shakespeare Company did an adaptation by Adrian Mitchell, for which the acting edition has been published. The Stratford Festival in Canada mounted a new production of Mitchell’s work in June 2016.
In 2003, there was an Australian commercial stage production which toured the country by Malcolm C. Cooke Productions, using both life-size puppets and human actors. It was directed by notable film director Nadia Tass, and starred Amanda Muggleton, Dennis Olsen, Meaghan Davies and Yolande Brown.
In 2011, a two-actor stage adaptation by Le Clanché du Rand opened Off-Broadway in New York City at St. Luke’s Theatre. The production was directed by Julia Beardsley O’Brien and starred Erin Layton and Andrew Fortman. As of 2014, the production is currently running with a replacement cast of Abigail Taylor-Sansom and Rockford Sansom.

Audio

Multiple audio editions have been released, both straightforward readings and dramatizations.
In 1981, Michael Hordern read abridged versions of the classic tale (and the others in the series). In 2000, an unabridged audio book was released, narrated by Michael York. (All the books were released in audio form, read by different actors.)
In 1988, BBC Radio 4 mounted a full dramatization. In 1998, Focus on the Family Radio Theatre also adapted this story. Both the original BBC version and the Focus on the Family version have been broadcast on BBC radio. Both are the first in a series of adaptations of all seven of the Narnia books. The BBC series uses the title Tales of Narnia, while the Focus on the Family version uses the more familiar Chronicles moniker. The Focus on the Family version is also longer, with a full orchestra score, narration, a larger cast of actors, and introductions by Douglas Gresham, C.S. Lewis’ stepson.

Film

In 2005, the story was adapted for a theatrical film, co-produced by Walt Disney and Walden Media. It has so far been followed by two more films: The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader. The latter was co-produced by Twentieth-Century Fox and Walden Media.

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BOM

Book of the Month
(BOM)

The book of the month is a book we have read for the month and want to share with you. We do look up info on the book and post a large summery about it but we only post the books we have read and we recognize the website we get the info from at the bottom of the post.

This months book is the book KayKay had for her summer reading for school. She had to read and do a project on it to take to school when they go back.

Who Was Christopher Columbus?
Author: Bonnie Bader
First published: Jun 27, 2013
Number of pages: 112
Genre: Ages 9-12 Biography

Learn all about Christopher Columbus’ early life at sea, which led him to seek fortune by sailing west in hopes of creating new trade routes with the Indies. Kids will read about why he called himself the “Great Admirald of the Seas” and learn of all his struggles to find finacial support for his voyage.

The Photos are of the cover and the sample pages amazon shares with you.

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BOM 6-15-17

Book of the Month Is…

BOM 6-15-17

The Silence of the Lambs is a novel by Thomas Harris. First published in 1988, it is the sequel to Harris’ 1981 novel Red Dragon. Both novels feature the cannibalistic serial killer Dr. Hannibal Lecter, this time pitted against FBI Special Agent Clarice Starling. Its film adaptation directed by Jonathan Demme was released in 1991 to box office success and critical acclaim.

Plot summary

Clarice Starling, a young FBI trainee, is asked to carry out an errand by Jack Crawford, the head of the FBI division that draws up psychological profiles of serial killers. Starling is to present a questionnaire to the brilliant forensic psychiatrist and cannibalistic serial killer, Hannibal Lecter. Lecter is serving nine consecutive life sentences in a Maryland mental institution for a series of murders.
Crawford’s real intention, however, is to try to solicit Lecter’s assistance in the hunt for a serial killer dubbed “Buffalo Bill”, whose modus operandi involves kidnapping overweight women, starving them for about three or four days, and then killing and skinning them, before dumping the remains in nearby rivers. The nickname was started by Kansas City Homicide, as a sick joke that “he likes to skin his humps.” Throughout the investigation, Starling periodically returns to Lecter in search of information, and the two form a strange relationship in which he offers her cryptic clues in return for information about her troubled and bleak childhood as an orphan.
When Bill’s sixth victim is found in West Virginia, Starling helps Crawford perform the autopsy. Starling finds a pupa in the throat of the victim, and just as Lecter predicted, she has been scalped. Triangular patches of skin have also been taken from her shoulders. Furthermore, autopsy reports indicate that Bill had killed her within four days of her capture, much faster than his earlier victims.

On the basis of Lecter’s prediction, Starling believes that he knows who Buffalo Bill really is. She also asks why she was sent to fish for information on Buffalo Bill without being told she was doing so; Crawford explains that if she had had an agenda, Lecter would have sensed it and never spoken up.

Starling takes the pupa to the Smithsonian, where it is eventually identified as the Black Witch moth, which would not naturally occur where the victim was found.

In Tennessee, Catherine Baker Martin, daughter of Senator Ruth Martin, is kidnapped. Within six hours, her blouse is found on the roadside, slit up the back: Buffalo Bill’s calling card. He traps her in an oubliette and begins to starve her. Crawford is advised that no less than the President of the United States has expressed “intense interest” in the case, and that a successful rescue is preferable. Crawford estimates they have three days before Catherine is killed. Starling is sent to Lecter with the offer of a deal: if he assists in Catherine’s rescue and Buffalo Bill’s capture, he will be transferred out of the asylum, something he has continually longed for. However, Lecter expresses skepticism at the genuineness of the offer.

After Starling leaves, Lecter reminisces on the past, recalling a conversation with Benjamin Raspail, a former patient whom he had eventually murdered. During therapy sessions, Raspail told Lecter about a former lover, Jame Gumb: after Raspail left Gumb and began dating a sailor named Klaus, Gumb became jealous and murdered Klaus, using his skin to make an apron. Raspail also revealed that Gumb had an epiphany upon watching a moth hatch.

Lecter’s ruminations are interrupted when Dr. Frederick Chilton – the asylum’s administrator and Lecter’s nemesis – steps in. A listening device allowed him to record Starling’s offer, and Chilton has found out that Crawford’s deal is a lie. He offers one of his own: If Lecter reveals Buffalo Bill’s identity, he will indeed get a transfer to another asylum, but only if Chilton gets credit for getting the information from him.

Lecter insists that he’ll only give the information to Senator Martin in person, in Tennessee. Chilton agrees. Unknown to Chilton, Lecter has previously hidden in his mouth a paperclip and some parts of a pen, which were mistakenly given to him by untrained orderlies over his many years at the asylum. He fashions the pen pieces and paperclip into an improvised lockpick, which he later uses to pick his handcuff locks.
In Tennessee, Lecter toys with Senator Martin briefly, enjoying the woman’s anguish, but eventually gives her some information about Buffalo Bill: his name is William “Billy” Rubin, and he has suffered from “elephant ivory anthrax”, a knifemaker’s disease. He also provides an accurate physical description. The name, however, is a red herring: bilirubin is a pigment in human bile and a chief coloring agent in human feces, which the forensic lab compares to the color of Chilton’s hair.
Starling tries one last time to get information from Lecter as he is about to be transferred. He offers a final clue – “we covet what we see every day” – and demands to hear her worst memory. Starling reveals that, after her father’s death, she was sent to live with a cousin on a sheep and horse ranch. One night, she discovered the farmer slaughtering the spring lambs, and fled in terror with one of the slaughter horses whom she named Hannah. The farmer caught her and sent her to an orphanage, where she spent the rest of her childhood, along with Hannah. Lecter thanks her, and the two share a brief moment of connection before Chilton forces her to leave. Later on, she deduces from Lecter’s clue that Buffalo Bill knew his first victim.
Shortly after this, Lecter escapes by killing and eviscerating his guards, using one of their faces as a mask to fool paramedics. Starling continues her search for Buffalo Bill, eventually tracking him down and killing him, rescuing Catherine. She is made a full-fledged FBI agent, and receives a congratulatory telegram from Lecter, who hopes that “the lambs have stopped screaming”.
While writing the letter, Lecter notes to himself that, while he will track down Chilton, Clarice assumes, correctly, he will not come after her. He also predicts correctly that saving Catherine Martin may have granted Clarice some relief, but that the silence will never become eternal, heralding her motives for a continued career at the FBI. Clarice eventually finds rest even after Lecter’s letter, sleeping peacefully “in the silence of the lambs”.

Characters

  • Clarice Starling
  • Dr. Hannibal Lecter
  • Jack Crawford
  • John Brigham
  • Jame “Buffalo Bill” Gumb
  • Barney Matthews
  • Ardelia Mapp
  • Dr. Frederick Chilton
  • Catherine Baker Martin
  • Senator Ruth Martin
  • Paul Krendler
  • Noble Pilcher
  • Albert Roden
  • I. J. Miggs

Literary significance

The novel was a great success. Craig Brown of The Mail on Sunday wrote, “No thriller writer is better attuned than Thomas Harris to the rhythms of suspense. No horror writer is more adept at making the stomach churn”. The Independent wrote, “Utterly gripping”, and Amazon.com wrote, “…driving suspense, compelling characters,…a well-executed thriller…” Children’s novelist, Roald Dahl also greatly enjoyed the novel, describing it as “subtle, horrific and splendid, the best book I have read in a long time”. Author David Foster Wallace used the book as part of his curriculum while teaching at Pomona College and later included the book as well as Harris’s Red Dragon on his list of ten favorite novels. John Dunning says of Silence of the Lambs: [it is] “simply the best thriller I’ve read in five years”.

Accolades

  • The novel won the 1988 Bram Stoker Award for Best Novel.
  • The novel also won the 1989 Anthony Award for Best Novel.
  • It was nominated for the 1989 World Fantasy Award.

Film adaptation

Main article: The Silence of the Lambs (film)
Following the 1986 adaptation of Red Dragon (filmed as Manhunter), The Silence of the Lambs was adapted by Jonathan Demme in 1991. The Silence of the Lambs became the third film in Oscar history to win the following five Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Screenplay. It stars Jodie Foster as Clarice Starling and Anthony Hopkins as Hannibal Lecter.

Musical adaptation

In 2005, comedian-musicians Jon and Al Kaplan parodied the story, especially the film, in Silence! The Musical. It premiered Off-Off-Broadway and has since had productions in London and Los Angeles.[citation needed] In 2012, the Los Angeles production won the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle awards for Score, Lead Performance, and Choreography.

I got all my Info off WIKIPEDIA: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Silence_of_the_Lambs_(novel)

BOM

This months book is The Scarlett Letter By: Nathaniel Hawthorne. I read this book in high school in the 11th grade. That was a while ago lol.

Title_page_for_The_Scarlet_Letter

 

The Scarlet Letter: A Romance is an 1850 work of fiction in a historical setting, written by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne. The book is considered to be his “masterwork”. Set in 17th-century Puritan Massachusetts Bay Colony, during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

Plot

In June 1642, in the Puritan town of Boston, a crowd gathers to witness the punishment of Hester Prynne, a young woman found guilty of adultery. She is required to wear a scarlet “A” (“A” standing for adulteress) on her dress to shame her. She must stand on the scaffold for three hours, to be exposed to public humiliation. As Hester approaches the scaffold, many of the women in the crowd are angered by her beauty and quiet dignity. When demanded and cajoled to name the father of her child, Hester refuses.

As Hester looks out over the crowd, she notices a small, misshapen man and recognizes him as her long-lost husband, who has been presumed lost at sea. When the husband sees Hester’s shame, he asks a man in the crowd about her and is told the story of his wife’s adultery. He angrily exclaims that the child’s father, the partner in the adulterous act, should also be punished and vows to find the man. He chooses a new name – Roger Chillingworth – to aid him in his plan.

The Reverend John Wilson and the minister of Hester’s church, Arthur Dimmesdale, question the woman, but she refuses to name her lover. After she returns to her prison cell, the jailer brings in Roger Chillingworth, a physician, to calm Hester and her child with his roots and herbs. He and Hester have an open conversation regarding their marriage and the fact that they were both in the wrong. Her lover, however, is another matter and he demands to know who it is; Hester refuses to divulge such information. He accepts this, stating that he will find out anyway, and forces her to hide that he is her husband. If she ever reveals him, he warns her, he will destroy the child’s father. Hester agrees to Chillingworth’s terms although she suspects she will regret it.

Following her release from prison, Hester settles in a cottage at the edge of town and earns a meager living with her needlework. She lives a quiet, sombre life with her daughter, Pearl. She is troubled by her daughter’s unusual fascination by Hester’s scarlet “A”. As she grows older, Pearl becomes capricious and unruly. Her conduct starts rumours, and, not surprisingly, the church members suggest Pearl be taken away from Hester.

Hester, hearing rumors that she may lose Pearl, goes to speak to Governor Bellingham. With him are ministers Wilson and Dimmesdale. Hester appeals to Dimmesdale in desperation, and the minister persuades the governor to let Pearl remain in Hester’s care.

Because Dimmesdale’s health has begun to fail, the townspeople are happy to have Chillingworth, a newly arrived physician, take up lodgings with their beloved minister. Being in such close contact with Dimmesdale, Chillingworth begins to suspect that the minister’s illness is the result of some unconfessed guilt. He applies psychological pressure to the minister because he suspects Dimmesdale to be Pearl’s father. One evening, pulling the sleeping Dimmesdale’s vestment aside, Chillingworth sees a symbol that represents his shame on the minister’s pale chest.

Tormented by his guilty conscience, Dimmesdale goes to the square where Hester was punished years earlier. Climbing the scaffold, he admits his guilt to them but cannot find the courage to do so publicly. Hester, shocked by Dimmesdale’s deterioration, decides to obtain a release from her vow of silence to her husband.

Several days later, Hester meets Dimmesdale in the forest and tells him of her husband and his desire for revenge. She convinces Dimmesdale to leave Boston in secret on a ship to Europe where they can start life anew. Renewed by this plan, the minister seems to gain new energy. On Election Day, Dimmesdale gives what is declared to be one of his most inspired sermons. But as the procession leaves the church, Dimmesdale climbs upon the scaffold and confesses his sin, dying in Hester’s arms. Later, most witnesses swear that they saw a stigma in the form of a scarlet “A” upon his chest, although some deny this statement. Chillingworth, losing his will for revenge, dies shortly thereafter and leaves Pearl a substantial inheritance.

After several years, Hester returns to her cottage and resumes wearing the scarlet letter. When she dies, she is buried near the grave of Dimmesdale, and they share a simple slate tombstone engraved with an escutcheon described as: “On a field, sable, the letter A, gules” (“On a field, black, the letter A, red”).

 

Major theme

 

Elmer Kennedy-Andrews remarks that Hawthorne in “The Custom-house” sets the context for his story and “tells us about ‘romance’, which is his preferred generic term to describe The Scarlet Letter, as his subtitle for the book – ‘A Romance’ – would indicate.” In this introduction, Hawthorne describes a space between materialism and “dreaminess” that he calls “a neutral territory, somewhere between the real world and fairy-land, where the Actual and the Imaginary may meet, and each imbues itself with nature of the other”. This combination of “dreaminess” and realism gave the author space to explore major themes.

 

Other themes

The experience of Hester and Dimmesdale recalls the story of Adam and Eve because, in both cases, sin results in expulsion and suffering. But it also results in knowledge – specifically, in knowledge of what it means to be immoral. For Hester, the Scarlet Letter is a physical manifestation of her sin and reminder of her painful solitude. She contemplates casting it off to obtain her freedom from an oppressive society and a checkered past as well as the absence of God. Because the society excludes her, she considers the possibility that many of the traditions held up by the Puritan culture are untrue and are not designed to bring her happiness.

As for Dimmesdale, the “cheating minister”, his sin gives him “sympathies so intimate with the sinful brotherhood of mankind, so that his chest vibrate[s] in unison with theirs.” His eloquent and powerful sermons derive from this sense of empathy. The narrative of the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale is quite in keeping with the oldest and most fully authorized principles in Christian thought. His “Fall” is a descent from apparent grace to his own damnation; he appears to begin in purity but he ends in corruption. The subtlety is that the minister’s belief is his own cheating, convincing himself at every stage of his spiritual pilgrimage that he is saved.

The rose bush’s beauty forms a striking contrast to all that surrounds it – as later the beautifully embroidered scarlet “A” will be held out in part as an invitation to find “some sweet moral blossom” in the ensuing, tragic tale and in part as an image that “the deep heart of nature” (perhaps God) may look more kind on the errant Hester and her child than her Puritan neighbors do. Throughout the work, the nature images contrast with the stark darkness of the Puritans and their systems.

Chillingworth’s misshapen body reflects (or symbolizes) the anger in his soul, which builds as the novel progresses, similar to the way Dimmesdale’s illness reveals his inner turmoil. The outward man reflects the condition of the heart; an observation thought to be inspired by the deterioration of Edgar Allan Poe, whom Hawthorne “much admired”.

Another theme is the extreme legalism of the Puritans and how Hester chooses not to conform to their rules and beliefs. Hester was rejected by the villagers even though she spent her life doing what she could to help the sick and the poor. Because of the social shunning, she spent her life mostly in solitude, and wouldn’t go to church.

As a result, she retreats into her own mind and her own thinking. Her thoughts begin to stretch and go beyond what would be considered by the Puritans as safe or even Christian. She still sees her sin, but begins to look on it differently than the villagers ever have. She begins to believe that a person’s earthly sins don’t necessarily condemn them. She even goes so far as to tell Dimmesdale that their sin has been paid for by their daily penance and that their sin won’t keep them from getting to heaven, however, the Puritans believed that such a sin surely condemns.

But Hester had been alienated from the Puritan society, both in her physical life and spiritual life. When Dimmesdale dies, she knows she has to move on because she can no longer conform to the Puritans’ strictness. Her thinking is free from religious bounds and she has established her own different moral standards and beliefs.

 

Publication history

It was long thought that Hawthorne originally planned The Scarlet Letter to be a shorter novelette which was part of a collection to be named Old Time Legends and that his publisher, James Thomas Fields, convinced him to expand the work to a full-length novel. This is not true: Fields persuaded Hawthorne to publish The Scarlet Letter alone (along with the earlier-completed “Custom House” essay) but he had nothing to do with the length of the story. Hawthorne’s wife Sophia later challenged Fields’ claims a little inexactly: “he has made the absurd boast that he was the sole cause of the Scarlet Letter being published!” She noted that her husband’s friend Edwin Percy Whipple, a critic, approached Fields to consider its publication. The manuscript was written at the Peter Edgerley House in Salem, Massachusetts, still standing as a private residence at 14 Mall Street. It was the last Salem home where the Hawthorne family lived.

The Scarlet Letter was first published in the spring of 1850 by Ticknor & Fields, beginning Hawthorne’s most lucrative period. When he delivered the final pages to Fields in February 1850, Hawthorne said that “some portions of the book are powerfully written” but doubted it would be popular. In fact, the book was an instant best-seller, though, over fourteen years, it brought its author only $1,500. Its initial publication brought wide protest from natives of Salem, who did not approve of how Hawthorne had depicted them in his introduction “The Custom-House”. A 2,500-copy second edition included a preface by Hawthorne dated March 30, 1850, that stated he had decided to reprint his Introduction “without the change of a word… The only remarkable features of the sketch are its frank and genuine good-humor … As to enmity, or ill-feeling of any kind, personal or political, he utterly disclaims such motives”.

The Scarlet Letter was also one of the first mass-produced books in America. In the mid-nineteenth century, bookbinders of home-grown literature typically hand-made their books and sold them in small quantities. The first mechanized printing of The Scarlet Letter, 2,500 volumes, sold out within ten days, and was widely read and discussed to an extent not much experienced in the young country up until that time. Copies of the first edition are often sought by collectors as rare books, and may fetch up to around $18,000 USD.

 

Critical response

On its publication, critic Evert Augustus Duyckinck, a friend of Hawthorne’s, said he preferred the author’s Washington Irving-like tales. Another friend, critic Edwin Percy Whipple, objected to the novel’s “morbid intensity” with dense psychological details, writing that the book “is therefore apt to become, like Hawthorne, too painfully anatomical in his exhibition of them”. English writer George Eliot called The Scarlet Letter, along with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow‘s 1855 book The Song of Hiawatha, the “two most indigenous and masterly productions in American literature”. Most literary critics praised the book but religious leaders took issue with the novel’s subject matter.[15] Orestes Brownson complained that Hawthorne did not understand Christianity, confession, and remorse. A review in The Church Review and Ecclesiastical Register concluded the author “perpetrates bad morals.”

On the other hand, 20th-century writer D. H. Lawrence said that there could not be a more perfect work of the American imagination than The Scarlet Letter. Henry James once said of the novel, “It is beautiful, admirable, extraordinary; it has in the highest degree that merit which I have spoken of as the mark of Hawthorne’s best things—an indefinable purity and lightness of conception…One can often return to it; it supports familiarity and has the inexhaustible charm and mystery of great works of art.”

I found all this info at:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scarlet_Letter

Their are several movies based on this book the most know is probably the one Demi Moore played in. It was done in 1995.

220px-Scarletlettermovieposter

BOM

This month we are continuing The Vampire Chronicles book collection. The second book is The Vampire Lestat that is the book for this month. I have now read the first 3 in this collection and I currently only have the first 4 so I will be stopping this collection after the 4th one unless I get another one in it. Ok here is a summary of the book The Vampire Lestat. It came from Wikipedia.

 

the-vampire-lestat

The Vampire Lestat (1985) is a vampire novel by Anne Rice, and the second in her Vampire Chronicles, following Interview with the Vampire. The story is told from the point of view of Lestat as narrator, and several events in the two books appear to contradict each other, allowing the reader to decide which version of events they believe to be accurate.

Plot summary[edit]

Set in the late 18th century to the late 1980s, the story follows the 200-year-long life of the vampire Lestat de Lioncourt, and his rise from humble beginnings as impoverished nobility in the countryside of the Auvergne in France, to the cosmopolitan city of Paris, to become transformed by the Dark Gift into a vampire.

After escaping his family and running off to Paris with his lover and confidante Nicolas de Lenfent, Lestat is kidnapped and bitten by the reclusive elder vampire Magnus, who orphans him on the night he is made but leaves him with a tower fortress and a vast fortune. Lestat abandons Nicki for fear of causing him harm and shuns contact with his loved ones. Instead, he decides to shower them with gifts and riches from his new found wealth, as a means to compensate his departure from their lives.

Later, his mother, Gabrielle, arrives to say goodbye to him, herself dying of consumption (tuberculosis). In order to save her, Lestat transforms her into his first immortal companion. He later turns Nicki into a vampire after Armand kidnaps him and they begin to grow apart because of Nicki’s sullenness; he later commits suicide by “going into the fire,” from severe depression. Armand “shows” Lestat the history of how he was made by Marius. Compelled by the idea of Marius, Lestat leaves markings carved into rock in numerous places while traveling with Gabrielle, hoping that one day, Marius will see them and find Lestat. Whilst in Egypt, abandoned by Gabrielle, Lestat sleeps in the ground after being burned by the sun, and is recovered by Marius who takes him to his secret Mediterranean island. There, Marius shares his past with him, and shows him Those Who Must Be Kept, Akasha and Enkil, who are the progenitors of all vampires. Once Marius has given his warning to Lestat not to go see them again, and leaves on a short outing, Lestat takes Nicolas’s old violin and plays for the King and Queen, awakening them. Akasha feeds from Lestat as Lestat feeds from her. Then, Enkil, furious at the intrusion, attacks and nearly kills Lestat, who is saved by Marius, and then sent away.

The book ends on a cliffhanger after Lestat’s debut concert in San Francisco, and leads directly into the third volume, The Queen of the Damned.

Adaptations[edit]

Anne Rice’s The Vampire Lestat[edit]

The Vampire Lestat was adapted into a comic and released as a 12-part miniseries by Innovation Comics in 1990 and 1991. The comic, which was formally titled Anne Rice’s The Vampire Lestat and featured Daerick Gross and Mike Okamoto as lead artists, had a script adapted from the novel by Rice and Faye Perozich. In 1991 the entire series was published as a graphic novel by Ballantine.[1]

Queen of the Damned[edit]

Portions of The Vampire Lestat were used and loosely interpreted, in the 2002 film adaptation of The Queen of the Damned.

The Film “Queen of the Damned” was seen to be a critical failure, and disappointed some viewers. Rice herself has dismissed the film. On her Facebook page, any time the subject is brought up, she repeatedly comments that The Queen of the Damned film is not something she can understand or embrace, that she encouraged them not to do the film and that it hurt her to see her work “mutilated” the way it was.[2]

Lestat: The Musical[edit]

The novel formed the basis for the short-lived 2006 Broadway show Lestat. The musical, which was composed by Elton John and Bernie Taupin and written by Linda Woolverton, had a pre-Broadway tryout in California in late 2005 and ran for a total of 33 previews and 39 official performances at the Palace Theater in New York.[3]

Film adaptation[edit]

A film adaptation of The Vampire Lestat was originally planned to go right into development after the filming of Interview with the Vampire, with a theatrical release that was said to have been marked for the late 1990s. Neil Jordan, director of Interview with the Vampire, took on the opportunity of adapting the novel. However, not only did development lead nowhere, there was much stress brought on by the project as time was limited before the novel’s rights would revert to Rice. This included Lorimar Pictures folding when Warner Bros. bought them out. David Geffen, after founding his own studio, attempted to take the rights with him to produce the sequels; however, the rights remained the property of Warner Bros. Rice confirmed that the project had difficulties at the time, describing the process as “stressful” for Warner Bros., and admitting there was “no good news” regarding the possible theatrical film. She also said via her website that her material was not comprehensible among producers; this statement would only prove true nearly a decade later when the loosely based film adaptation for The Queen of the Damned was released.

As of August 2009, talks have been underway in the continuation of The Vampire Chronicles film series, with The Vampire Lestat being the next film to be focused on in the series. Robert Downey Jr. was reported to be in talks to take the role of Lestat, but he has dismissed the rumors. Film producers reportedly want to revive the film series in the wake of a string of successful vampire films including Twilight and the HBO series True Blood—and Downey Jr. was reportedly in contention to take the lead.

On May 13, 2011 Rice posted on her Facebook page saying that she had “good news, good for me, and good for my beloved Lestat. I hope soon I can say something more coherent and informative, but for now, I’m celebrating.” Many of her fans believe this is an insinuation of a new adaptation of the novel.

Ron Howard’s production company, Imagine Entertainment, had optioned the motion picture rights to Anne’s fourth novel in her Vampire Chronicles series, The Tale of the Body Thief in early 2012. Their proposal for the film was to treat Lestat as if “audiences have not met him before.” In April 2013, Rice herself announced during an interview on her son’s radio show that the project had been dismissed due to an indifference between those involved. However, Rice did specifically state that the issue could be worked out someday.

In August 2014, Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment acquired the motion picture rights to the entire Vampire Chronicles series, with producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci signed to helm the potential film franchise. The deal also included a screenplay for The Tale of the Body Thief (1992) adapted by Christopher Rice.[4] In May 2016, writer-director Josh Boone posted a photo on Instagram of the cover a script written by him and Jill Killington.[5][6][7] Titled Interview with the Vampire, it is based on the novel of the same name and its sequel, The Vampire Lestat.[5][6][7] However, in November 2016 Universal did not renew the contract, and the film and television rights reverted to Rice, who began developing the Vampire Chronicles into a television series with Christopher.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Vampire_Lestat

 

BOM

Our book of the month is Interview with the Vampire from The Vampire Chronicles Collection By Anne Rice. I have the 3 in one copy of the book so I will do the first 3 for our first books I also have the 4th book in the collection as well. I know this book is more adult oriented and we will have some kids books coming to but this is what I picked first because I love it so much. I am going to give you a brief summery of the book. If you want to you can also watch the movie.

BOM

Interview with the Vampire

Interview with the Vampire is a debut gothic horror and vampire novel by American author Anne Rice, published in 1976. Based on a short story Rice wrote around 1968, the novel centers on vampire Louis de Pointe du Lac, who tells the story of his life to a reporter. Rice composed the novel shortly after the death of her young daughter Michelle, who served as an inspiration for the child-vampire character Claudia. Though initially the subject of mixed critical reception, the book was followed by a large number of widely popular sequels, collectively known as The Vampire Chronicles. A film adaptation was released in 1994, starring Brad Pitt and Tom Cruise, and the novel has been adapted as a comic three times.

Interview with the Vampire book synopsis

A vampire named Louis tells his 200-year-long life story to a reporter referred to simply as “the boy”. In 1791, Louis is a young indigo plantation owner living south of New Orleans. Distraught by the death of his pious brother, he seeks death in any way possible. Louis is approached by a vampire named Lestat de Lioncourt, who desires Louis’ company. Lestat turns Louis into a vampire and the two become immortal companions. Lestat spends time feeding off the local plantation slaves while Louis, who finds it morally repugnant to murder humans to survive, feeds from animals. Louis and Lestat are forced to leave when Louis’ slaves begin to fear the monsters with which they live and instigate an uprising. Louis sets his own plantation aflame; he and Lestat exterminate the plantation slaves to keep word from spreading about vampires living in Louisiana. Gradually, Louis bends under Lestat’s influence and begins feeding from humans. He slowly comes to terms with his vampire nature, but also becomes increasingly repulsed by what he perceives as Lestat’s total lack of compassion for the humans he preys upon. Escaping to New Orleans, Louis feeds off a plague-ridden young girl, who is five years old, whom he finds next to the corpse of her mother. Louis begins to think of leaving Lestat and going his own way. Fearing this, Lestat then turns the girl into a vampire “daughter” for them, to give Louis a reason to stay. She is then given the name Claudia. Louis is initially horrified that Lestat has turned a child into a vampire, but soon begins to care for Claudia. Claudia takes to killing easily, but she begins to realize over time she can never grow up; her mind matures into that of an intelligent, assertive woman, but her body remains that of a young girl. Claudia blames Lestat for her condition and, after 60 years of living with him, she hatches a plot to kill Lestat by poisoning him and cutting his throat. Claudia and Louis then dump his body into a nearby swamp. As Louis and Claudia prepare to flee to Europe, Lestat appears, having recovered from Claudia’s attack, and attacks them in turn. Louis sets fire to their home and barely escapes with Claudia, leaving a furious Lestat to be consumed by the flames. Arriving in Europe, Louis and Claudia seek out more of their kind. They travel throughout eastern Europe first and do indeed encounter vampires, but these vampires appear to be nothing more than mindless animated corpses. It is only when they reach Paris that they encounter vampires like themselves – specifically, the 400-year-old vampire Armand and his coven at the Théâtre des Vampires. Inhabiting an ancient theater, Armand and his vampire coven disguise themselves as humans and feed on live, terrified humans in mock-plays before a live human audience. Claudia is repulsed by these vampires and what she considers to be their cheap theatrics, but Louis and Armand are drawn to each other. Convinced that Louis will leave her for Armand, Claudia convinces Louis to turn a Parisian doll maker, Madeleine, into a vampire to serve as a replacement companion. Louis, Madeleine and Claudia live together for a brief time, but all three are abducted one night by the Theatre vampires. Lestat has arrived, having survived the fire in New Orleans. His accusations against Louis and Claudia result in Louis being locked in a coffin to starve, while Claudia and Madeleine are locked in an open courtyard. Armand arrives and releases Louis from the coffin, but Madeleine and Claudia are burned to death by the rising sun. A devastated Louis finds the ashen remains of Claudia and Madeleine. He returns to the Theatre late the following night, burning it to the ground and killing all the vampires inside, leaving with Armand. Together, the two travel across Europe for several years, but Louis never fully recovers from Claudia’s death, and the emotional connection between himself and Armand quickly dissolves. Tired of the Old World, Louis returns to New Orleans in the early 20th century. Living as a loner, he feeds off any humans who cross his path, but lives in the shadows, never creating another companion for himself. Telling the boy of one last encounter with Lestat in New Orleans in the 1920s, Louis ends his tale; after 200 years, he is weary of immortality and of all the pain and suffering to which he has had to bear witness. The boy, however, seeing only the great powers granted to a vampire, begs to be made into a vampire himself. Angry that his interviewer learned nothing from his story, Louis refuses, attacking the boy and vanishing without a trace. The boy then leaves to track down Lestat in the hopes that he can give him immortality.

Background and publication

In 1970, while Anne Rice was attending a graduate program in Creative Writing at San Francisco State University, her daughter Michelle, then about four years old, was diagnosed with acute granulocytic leukemia. Michelle died of the illness about two years later, and Rice fell into a deep depression, turning to alcohol in order to cope. Later reviewers and commentators identified Michelle as an inspiration for the character of Claudia.

In 1973, while still grieving the loss of her daughter, Rice began reworking a previously written short story, which she had written in 1968 or 1969. Thirty pages long, the short story was written from the interviewer’s perspective. She decided to expand “Interview with the Vampire” into a novel at the encouragement of one of her husband’s students, who enjoyed her writing. It took her five weeks to complete the 338-page novel: she did research on vampires during the day and often wrote during the night.

After completing the novel and following many rejections from publishers, Rice developed obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). She became obsessed with germs, thinking that she contaminated everything she touched, engaged in frequent and obsessive hand washing and obsessively checked locks on windows and doors. Of this period, Rice says, “What you see when you’re in that state is every single flaw in our hygiene and you can’t control it and you go crazy.”

In August 1974, Rice attended the Squaw Valley Writer’s Conference at Squaw Valley, conducted by writer Ray Nelson. While at the conference, she met her future literary agent, Phyllis Seidel. In October 1974, Seidel sold the publishing rights to Interview with the Vampire to Alfred A. Knopf for a $12,000 advance of the hardcover rights, at a time when most new authors were receiving $2,000 advances. Interview with the Vampire was published in May 1976. In 1977, the Rice’s traveled to both Europe and Egypt for the first time.

Upon its release, Interview with the Vampire received mixed reviews from critics. A reviewer for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch gave the book a positive review, describing the prose as “hypnotically poetic in tone, rich in sensory imagery,” while other reviews were more negative. “To pretend that it has any purpose beyond suckling eroticism is rank hypocrisy,” wrote Edith Milton of The New Republic. As of February 2008[update], the novel had sold 8 million copies worldwide.

The book spawned a total of eleven sequels, collectively known as The Vampire Chronicles, and the spin-off series New Tales of the Vampires. The first sequel, The Vampire Lestat, was published in 1985 and sold more than 75,000 copies in its first printing, garnering largely favorable reviews. 1988’s The Queen of the Damned improved on Lestat’s numbers, receiving an initial hardcover run of 405,000 and topping the New York Times Best Seller list. Rice’s vampire books share a fictional universe with her series Lives of the Mayfair Witches and the novel The Mummy, or Ramses the Damned

Adaptations

Film

The film rights to Interview were at times controlled by Paramount Pictures, Lorimar, and Warner Bros., the distributor of the film, before The Geffen Film Company acquired the rights. Director Neil Jordan rewrote Rice’s first draft of the screenplay, though she received sole credit. Brad Pitt starred as Louis, Tom Cruise starred as Lestat, Antonio Banderas co-starred as Armand, as did a young Kirsten Dunst as the child vampire Claudia. Most of the movie’s shooting had been completed by October 1993, and all that remained were the few scenes involving the interviewer that would then be inserted at various points throughout the film. Production of those scenes was put on hold for a few weeks whilst River Phoenix, who had been cast as the interviewer, finished working on the film Dark Blood. Phoenix died from an overdose later that month, and Christian Slater was then cast as the interviewer Molloy. Slater donated his entire salary to Earth Save and Earth Trust, two of Phoenix’s favorite charities.

The film was released in November 1994 to generally positive critical reaction, and received Academy Award nominations for Best Art Direction and Best Original Score. Dunst was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film. Rice had initially voiced her objections to the casting of Cruise as Lestat, preferring Rutger Hauer for the role. After seeing the film, however, she voiced her support for the film, saying, “That Tom did make Lestat work was something I could not see in a crystal ball. It’s to his credit that he proved me wrong.”

In August 2014, Universal Pictures and Imagine Entertainment acquired the motion picture rights to the entire Vampire Chronicles series, with producers Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci signed to helm the potential film franchise. The deal also included a screenplay for The Tale of the Body Thief (1992) adapted by Christopher Rice. In May 2016, writer-director Josh Boone posted a photo on Instagram of the cover a script written by him and Jill Killington. Titled Interview with the Vampire, it is based on the novel of the same name and its sequel, The Vampire Lestat. However, in November 2016 Universal did not renew the contract, and the film and television rights reverted to Rice, who began developing the Vampire Chronicles into a television series with Christopher.

Comics

Innovation Comics published a twelve-issue comic book adaptation of Interview with the Vampire in 1992, following up on adaptations of The Vampire Lestat and The Queen of the Damned. A Japanese manga adaptation by Udou Shinohara was published in 1994 by Tokuma Shoten. It was also serialized in both Animage and Chara magazines. In 2012, the graphic novel Interview with the Vampire: Claudia’s Story was published by Yen Press, retelling much of the original novel from the point of view of child vampire Claudia.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interview_with_the_Vampire